Tag Archives: Breakfast

Pinhead or steel cut oats for Brekkers

The Sangeeta version.

 

A bowl of slow cooked pinhead oats, lavished with thick coconut milk, bananas, pomegranate and some macadamia nuts !

Delicious !!

My mantra is soak everything for at least 7 hours !

Pix off the net, with thanks …

Brekkie, in some style !

Veggies are good at breakfast, I read, they are especially good, as they’re nutritious, full of antioxidants, provide very few calories per portion, and are packed with fiber—which is filling because it takes up space in your digestive system. Fiber also slows digestion, which means you’ll have a steadier supply of energy over a longer period of time.

So rooted in the fridge this morning and voila :

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A simple fried egg-white, stacked on walnut bread cut to size and garnished with a light salad of cherry tomatoes, avocado, some parsley, some Japanese cucumber and pomegranate arils tossed with balsamic vinegar, olive oil, salt and pepper.

Oops … forgot to mention the most important part – a layer of hummus (made sans garlic) between the egg and the bread !

Tasted every bit as good as it looked !

Thanks Veron.

The info on veggies for breakfast from http://time.com/4583581/healthy-food-meal-protein/?xid=newsletter-brief

A Green and Delish Breakfast

So, no grains. Nothing acidic. Light yet filling. Tasty.

This is entirely Veron’s creation and it was so good, so good.

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Boiled eggs, halved. Yolk discarded.

Avocado into guacamole sans tomatoes (and it tasted better).

Organic kale chopped, freshened with a simple olive oil/lemon juice/salt/pepper dressing.

Roasted pine nuts.

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And for those who wanted grains and yolk, a different version. Wholemeal walnut bread. The yolks atop the guacamole.

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Try it for that sense of total well-being after the meal !

Breakfast in a Mason Jar

This worked brilliantly – easy, delish and convenient. The Cuisinart smoothie-blender is very ergonomic and this came out tops. And the Mason jars are great to walk around with …

The Banana Bonanza (for 2) IMG_0920

  • 2 ripe bananas
  • 2 tablespoons raw oats
  • 8 almonds
  • 1 tablespoon flaxseed meal
  • 1/2 cup vanilla flavoured Greek yoghurt
  • 1/2 a cup (or to taste) skimmed milk
  • a few cubes of ice

Blend, blend, blend.

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Vasu’s Coconut Chutney

Simple, and whipped up in a flash.

In India, and breakfast is all things South Indian, which means dosas, idlis … and today, adais for breakfast. I watched her deftly prepare the accompaniment, and here is the how.

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  • 1 cup freshly grated coconut
  • 1 pod garlic
  • bit of fresh ginger, one and a half times the size of the garlic pod
  • 4 sprigs coriander leaves, with stem
  • salt
  • 1/4 tsp tamarind

Blend all of the above together into a thick paste.

Tarka : In a teaspoon (or a bit more) of hot oil, sputter jeera seeds, mustard and a few curry leaves and pour over the ground mixture.

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Bon Appetit

This is to kick off the memories : Paris 2009 with friends : a holiday of the senses, an effervescence of food, an exploration of haute cuisine, gastro-tourism, Michelin stars, Michelin guides and just plain ordinary eating.

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The compact, businesslike (soon to be rated Michelin discovery) Le Gaigne in the Marais quarter (third arrondissement) makes a persuasive case to the purse; it is a reason to dress up for some fine dining, and best of all, is just around the corner. Preceded by the ritual of trying on outfits, shared make-up and compliments, the five course Le Menu Dégustation, each paired with a wine and exquisitely served on slabs of black slate, is both delightful and a trifle disappointing. The seafood starter in a shot glass – Verrine de Coquillages en gelée, mousse et coulis de Céléris – is not unpleasant and deserves mention if only for the layered, pureed, spinach; and the braised endives with ham or Millefeuilles d’Endives étuvées et véritable jambon de Paris de M. Leguel, is an out and out winner, a mélange of the sweet, the sour and the piquant.

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The closely packed tables are enveloped in a buzz of conversation, rising and falling in a miscellany of accents. The food is local, organic and fresh, and if organic is unavailable, ‘alternatively produced’ replacements are substituted, where possible. Chef Mikael Gaignon is young and known, having worked in two Pierre Gagnaire restaurants and this, Le Gaigne, is his first restaurant as patron. Given the prices are not Michelin star prices, it certainly offers value for money – and the wines are superbly matched.

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Ladurée (75 Avenue des Champs-Elysées, Tel : 01.40.75.08.75), opened as a tea room in the 1930’s  at a time when women were not allowed to enter cafés (an exclusive domain of men) and soon became hugely successful with the ladies of Paris. Today, a brand unto itself, it is famous worldwide for its pastries and double-decker macaroons (of which 15,000 are sold everyday according to their website). These legendary macaroons featured in a scene between Marie-Antoinette and Ambassador Mercy in Sofia Coppola’s Marie Antoinette.

Originally founded in 1862 as a bakery, it was burnt down in the Paris Commune uprising of 1871 and rebuilt as a pastry shop. It came into its own in 1930 when Desfontaines, the grandson, came up with the idea of sticking two macaroon shells together with creamy ganache (a whipped filling of chocolate and cream), reinventing the macaroon originally introduced by Catherine de’ Medici to France in the 16th century.

The celadon interiors and the waiting in line is an experience in itself, almost like being caught in a boudoir web within a time warp. Brunch has a very ‘ladies who lunch’ feel to it, made inelegant by recalcitrant swiveling seats which make it hard to look graceful, much less balance a china cup of tea delicately. Depending on your taste, the macaroon is either a fantastic melt-in-your-mouth experience, or not quite all that it is cracked up to be.

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Ladurée macaroon boxes are available from their counter at the Charles de Gaulle airport (should you want to take some home) and it is recommended that the macaroons be eaten within three to four days.

Le Trumilou (84 Quai de L’Hotel de Ville, Tel : 01.42.77.63.98,) will be remembered for a perfect meal on a sunny autumn day, a Sunday lunch of escargots lusciously awash in butter and garlic, chilled Sancerre, foaming Leffe, canard pruneaux (duck with prunes), ris veau (veal sweetbread), oeuf a la neige (floating islands) and tarte aux pommes, apple tarts, warm and melting.

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dsc07351It will be remembered as a quintessential French bistrot experience; traditional farm fare and dishes lovingly cooked for hours … and warm sidewalk café crèmes served in the sun, fueling hours of insouciant banter; and your table’s giddy, infectious good humor snags the attention of the man at the adjacent table (ostensibly reading a French translation of Dan Brown’s latest offering) … all this, followed by a siesta on the banks of the Seine on a sunny afternoon.

Le Baiser Salé aka The Salty Kiss (58 Rue des Lombards, Tel : 01.42. 33. 37. 71) is for the nights, for the atmosphere and the perfect evening of jazz, (no fancy wannabe jazz bar in an upstart slick street); this is cellar and decrepit loft, knee to knee in appreciation with other music lovers. A jazz festival is on, Afro-Caribbean, Afro-Latino, salsa, merengue, R & B, fusion … and tonight is mellifluous and the mojitos, margaritas and 1664’s enhance the sweetly evocative articulations of sax and bass guitar.

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For a quick dinner before the show, or between shows, nip across to La P’tit Cantine (22 Rue des Lombardes, Tel : 01.42. 71. 44. 48) for a decent meal of meat and wine.

Le Connétable (55 Rue des Archives, Tel : 01.42. 77. 41. 40) is a chance encounter turned good. The bread is fresh and crusty, the Côtes du Rhône deeply red and invigorating, and the conversation is about men. Pork filet mignons in a Roquefort sauce, veal medallions, rump steaks in (green pepper) saus poivre vert, celery puréed with butter and cream … unpretentious food and robust wine.

Known for its local artists and chanson music (a la Edith Piaf); tonight, in the cellar-cave below, three painfully young men sing French a cappella, gentle croons, warbles and a harmony that has the young audience rapt. Berets are doffed; a battered saucepan is passed around for coins.

Angelina (226 Rue de Rivoli, Tel : 01. 42. 60. 82. 00) is the renowned Parisian gourmet teahouse in the elegant style of the Belle Époque era, designed by the French architect Edouard-Jean Niermans. An institution since its inception, it is known both for its clientele (aristocracy, fashion designers, authors, philosophers et al) as for its Mont Blanc gateau and hot chocolate (closely guarded century old proprietary recipes). The famous Mont Blanc – as well as most of their gateaux – have all been consumed by the end of the day, so if the intent is to eat, get there before teatime. The queues are long and so is the waiting time. The house special, the African Hot Chocolate, is worth every second of the patient wait and the sorbets are richly satisfying, beyond any imagination.

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Restaurant Le 404 (69 Rue des Gravilliers, Tel : 01.44.71.57.81) Le 404 restaurant … exhibits all the vibrant flavours and colours of North Africa. Retrofitted into a 16th century building, 404’s interior is all Berber with pouf seating, exposed beams and stones, tooled leather, authentic artifacts. … The menu features all the dishes … from that part of the world: couscous, tagines, grilled meats, skewered things. The wine list features some unusual Mahgrebi bottles … Grab a drink at Andy Wahloo’s, the sibling bar next door – everybody does, and ‘everybody’ includes show-biz and celebrities.

The evening is an sensory extravaganza; the warm glow of Moroccan lanterns, suspended, lamps and candles holders of iron fretwork dispersing flickering light on dishes heaped with Middle Eastern fare, meat, pigeon, chicken, semolina, pickled lemons, nuts, dates, figs, raisins; the fragrance of spices – cumin, coriander, saffron, chiles, ginger, cinnamon, paprika; a décor of earthen hues, the murmur of conversation, the hiss and sizzle from the stove, the pop of a champagne cork … epicurean hedonism.

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Our last dinner in Paris, Le 404 remains burnished in the memory as a golden experience, beginning with the first mojito, redolent with fresh mint. Chilled Chablis follows with fava beans & olives, Mechoui Maison (roasted shoulder of lamb), pastilla pigeon plat (wild pigeon in pastry), tagine poulet citron (chicken with preserved lemon and olives) and the couscous 7 legumes. And to end a meal of meals, salade d’oranges et fleur d’ orange and pastilla dattes (pastry with dates) accompanied by fresh, aromatic coffee.

Le Pain Quotidien, 18-20, Rue de Archives, Tel :  1 44 54 03 07, is a quiet delight, part of a global chain that first opened in Brussels in 1990. Bakery and communal table; breakfast, lunch, brunch (organic where possible, with vegan and vegetarian options) and simple boulangerie fare – soups, salads, tartines, homemade pastries, handmade organic bread – artisanal dishes, community eating at a long wooden trestle table.

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No gastronomic journey is complete without a nod to junk food and the Googrill beef and chicken burgers at Quality Hamburger Restaurant (63 Boulevard Saint Michel, Tel : 01.42. 71. 44. 48) … ils sont délicieux, elles sont parfaits.

Bon appétit, says the garçon, placing the bottle of Sancerre on the table, gently.

And so we do, meal after meal after glorious meal.

Trying out gluten free cereals …

Gluten free small batch toasted organic rice flakes, walnuts, flax seeds and palm sugar shavings. Would you buy ?

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I don’t eat cereal … but if I did, I would.

I certainly would. How does it taste ? Been eating the muesli every day. Enjoying it, especially with virgin coconut oil, no milk.

It tastes great. Coconut oil ? Interesting. Doesn’t it taste oily ?

Yes, doesn’t sound too exciting !

Not oily in the least. Virgin coconut oil – very light. Getting to like it more and more.

Breakfast Muesli : Recipe for Syl

Is the one you are referring to ?

‘… which I had it at your place a 100 years ago …’

dried-apricots How-to-Make-Flax-Powder th blueberries Granola-Pumpkin-NEW coconut oil

Muesli

  • ½ cup sunflower seeds, toasted
  • ¼ cup pumpkin seeds, toasted
  • 1 cup hazelnuts, toasted, chopped
  • 1 cup oats
  • 1 cup wheat flakes
  • 1 cup barley flakes
  • 1 cup raisins
  • ½ cup chopped dried apricots
  • 2 cups dried apple slices, halved
  • 1/3 cup dessicated coconut (optional)

Mix all together, store in an airtight container.

IMG_4934 (2)Some additions : when serving, add a tablespoon of virgin coconut oil, powdered flaxseeds, a few almonds, some fresh blueberries, a tablespoon of pomegranate arils, chopped banana (if you like) and a handful of those millet flakes that are so crisp and crunchy.

Pix from the net.

An Indian Breakfast that never got made … Chez Rosalyn Mary, Coonoor

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Pesarattu or Dhal Dosa

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  • Whole green moong dhal, sprouted
  • Half and half of split yellow and green moong dhal
  • A handful of rice (for crispness)
  • Red chili
  • Ginger
  • A pinch of hing or asephoetida
  • Salt
  • Onions, coriander and curry leaves, finely chopped
  1. Soak the dals overnight.
  2. Grind to a fine paste with the rice, chili, ginger and hing.
  3. Stir in onions, coriander and curry leaves.
  4. Make dosas – no fermenting of the batter required.

Serve with Garlic Chutney.

Garlic Chutney

  • Garlic
  • Dry red chili
  • Onions
  • Freshly grated coconut
  • A small ball of tamarind (to your taste)
  • Salt

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  1. Saute the garlic, onion and red chili.
  2. Grind with remaining ingredients.

Picture of pesarattu from http://www.boldsky.com

Breakfasts Chez Rosalyn Mary, Coonoor

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Parsi Eggs aka Khagina

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  • Onions, sliced
  • Green chilis, de-seeded, diced
  • Couple of cloves garlic, minced
  • Bit of ginger, minced
  • Eggs (as required – we used four)
  • Salt and pepper
  • Plenty of fresh coriander, chopped
  1. In hot olive oil, saute onion, garlic, chili and ginger to a golden brown, making a ‘nest’ in the pan.
  2. Break the eggs carefully in, over this, close with a lid and let it set and cook.
  3. Season with salt and pepper, garnish with coriander.

Serve with a multi-grain bread, sausages on the side, Easter Orange marmalade, grape jam … and cups of hot coffee !!

‘Left Over’ Roast Chicken Sandwiches

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A no-brainer ! Too sated for dinner, so carried over to breakfast and sustenance for long car journeys …

  • Roasted chicken, flaked and mixed with chopped capsicum and mayonnaise
  • Toasted / not toasted bread
  • Arugula, herbs from the herb garden, spritzed with olive oil, salt and pepper
  • Chopped apples
  • Walnuts
  • A sprinkle of mixed nuts
  • A knob of cheese – whatever’s going …

Assemble and enjoy with tall glasses of cold mineral water a la Nilgiris (and pop a lactose bacilli pill while you’re at it !)

The Dalia Dosa

Bursting with health !

Whole wheat, broken up, she said, do you get it in Singapore ? Hmm, I do get the ‘dalia‘ I replied and she said, perfect. Though dalia is normally eaten at night because it is ‘light’, I would prefer that you had it in the morning because I believe it is better absorbed when taken for breakfast. So :

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Dalia, soaked for a few hours or overnight, ground to a batter

chopped tomatoes

chopped onions

couple of pods garlic, crushed

fresh green chili, to taste, chopped

curry leaves in slivers

a dose of hing or asephoetida

salt

chopped coriander to garnish

  1. Mix everything except the coriander into the dalia batter.
  2. Heat a non-stick pan, add half a teaspoon of olive oil, pour in batter and make a savoury dalia pancake – brown lightly on both sides. It cooks faster if briefly covered with a lid, much like an omelet.

Garnish, and enjoy hot, either by itself or with a tomato-onion chutney.

Dalia, as it is known in India, is also known as bulgur elsewhere in the world. Thanks, Ms Dalal.
Picture borrowed from http://www.nandyala.org/mahanandi/?p=401

Preparing yourself for a new food programme

Having recently embarked on a new food regime to re-balance and recalibrate one’s metabolism for optimal functioning, we had to undergo a week of preparing the body – a kind of cleansing or detox. Here are the fundamentals.

8 – 10 glasses of water a day.

6.15 a.m. : One glass of water before coffee

Green tea, twice a day

2 cups of vegetable salads every day

  • Use low fat salad dressings like vinegerettes, salsa, herbs, no/low oil dressings
  • Use onions, tomatoes, radish, cucumbers, lettuce, carrots, capsicum / coloured bell peppers, sprouts, salad leaves

200ml of milk and 100gm yoghurt every day

Cooked dishes

Use low fat bases like tomato-onion, spice, coriander-mint or vinegar based gravies.           No high fat bases with almonds, cashews, cream, coconut, cheese, other nuts and/or garnishes like raisins, extra ghee etc .

  • Breakfast is HEAVY and dinner is LIGHT
  • Salad with every breakfast – bigger, heavier vegetables
  • Salad with every dinner – using salad leaves

Non-Vegetarian

  • Chicken – only lean cuts – no skin and fat, no organ meats.
  • Fish – fatty fishes like king fish, pomfret, sardines etc, NO shell fishes – prawns, mussels, crabs, lobsters etc
  • No Red meat

Grilled/Tandoori chicken and fish are excellent ways to cook

Do not overcook, do not use butter or other fats to bast, cook or marinate the meat.         Use a tsp of oil as an option.

Good Fats

Include walnuts, almonds, pistachios, sunflower seeds, flax seeds and virgin olive oil or cold pressed flax seed oil

Calcium : Very important – do not have with a meal, or with tea or coffee