Tag Archives: Chili pepper

Sweet Paul’s Famous Feta & Lemon Dip

Came across this first in his cookbook and then online – will be trying it out very soon. Looks and sounds terrific.

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This is the most blogged, tweeted, and pinned recipe I have ever created. It’s also one of the simplest recipes ever. Just a few ingredients, 2 minutes in the food processor, and voila, you have the most amazing dip. I’ve even used it as a topping for baked chicken or white fish.

– Paul Lowe

Serves 4

  • 7 ounces feta cheese (about 1 cup crumbled)
  • 1 tablespoon grated lemon zest, plus more for garnish
  • 1–2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for serving
  • Pinch of red pepper flakes
  • Crudités, chips, toasts, or pita crisps, for serving
  1. Place the feta, lemon zest, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, garlic, and olive oil in a blender and whir until combined but still slightly chunky. It’s dense, so you may need to stir it with a fork once or twice. Taste, and if it’s too salty add more lemon juice.
  2. Spoon into a serving bowl, drizzle with a little oil, and sprinkle with a pinch of pepper flakes and some lemon zest.
  3. Serve with crudités, chips, toasts or pita crisps.

 

Thanks Paul !

http://www.sweetpaulmag.com/food/lemon-and-feta-dip

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Jen’s Raw Papaya ‘Subzi’ with Mustard

don’t ask for proportions … the regular, like we do our indian sabjis, but it has to be mustard-y … so the ground mustard paste … be generous !
its quite delicious

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  • raw papaya, cut in thin, small slices
  • urud dal (urud dal explained)
  • hing (asephoetida)
  • mustard seeds
  • green chilis, slit (de-seeded if you want less fire in the dish)
  • 1 dried red chili
  • a bit of water
  • salt
  • ground mustard seeds or the kasundi mustard sauce
  • chopped coriander
  • juliennes of fresh ginger, for garnish
  1. add the urud dal and hing to hot oil
  2. then add mustard seeds, slit green chili and 1 dried red chili
  3. when it stops sputtering, add the papaya and a little water and salt and cook till the water dries up/papaya is cooked(it should retain its bite, not become pulpy)
  4. now add the ground mustard seeds OR prepared mustard (kasundi) and chopped coriander

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Notes :

Mustard powder : do you just grind the seeds or do you soak them first and grind with green chili and salt to a paste ?

soak it, not too long and grind it with or with the chili and salt for a one time use. i guess if you want to store it, then some vinegar and salt makes sense. ask a bengali … they do a fresh grind very often … i am not the expert.

Grinding a fresh green chili with soaked mustard takes some of the bitterness away – from my Bengali sister in law.

Nasi Tumpeng : A Birthday Celebration

A birthday and a surprise : Nasi Tumpeng.

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A birthday gift (and surprise from Veronica), a celebratory dinner. Nasi Tumpeng, the elaborate rice dish from Indonesia, painstakingly made with love.

The rice – uduk rice tinged yellow with turmeric – is moulded by a cone-shaped woven bamboo container and occupies center stage on a tampah or round woven bamboo plate layered with a banana leaf. An assortment of Indonesian dishes form the base.

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Tonight, it is quail eggs, urap or vegetables (sliced cucumbers, cherry tomatoes), meat kebabs wrapped in seaweed strips, telur pindang or  boiled marble eggs, ayam goreng or fried chicken, a spicy sambal, chicken fritters or perkedel, sliced boiled eggs.

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And on the side, a gravy of diced potatoes, snow peas and tofu.

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According to Wiki, there is a philosophical meaning to every part of a traditional tumpeng. Folklore in Java and Bali draw parallels between the cone-shaped tumpeng (a mystic symbol of life) and ecosystems. The various side dishes and vegetables represent life and harmony in nature. The height of the cone symbolizes the greatness of Allah, and the food at the base of the cone symbolizes nature’s abundance. The yellow tinge in the rice symbolizes wealth and high morals.

The authentic tumpeng should contain at least one animal meat to represent a land animal, fish to represent sea creatures and egg to represent winged beasts. Vegetables represent food provided by the plant kingdom.

Whenever there is a reason to give thanks – a wedding, birthday, anniversary or new year – the tumpeng is the dish, with the rice representing gold and the many dishes surrounding it indicating a bounty of food and luck.

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And so the birthday was celebrated, with love and gratitude.

Thank you Veron. It was delicious and it was deeply appreciated.

 

The Dalia Dosa

Bursting with health !

Whole wheat, broken up, she said, do you get it in Singapore ? Hmm, I do get the ‘dalia‘ I replied and she said, perfect. Though dalia is normally eaten at night because it is ‘light’, I would prefer that you had it in the morning because I believe it is better absorbed when taken for breakfast. So :

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Dalia, soaked for a few hours or overnight, ground to a batter

chopped tomatoes

chopped onions

couple of pods garlic, crushed

fresh green chili, to taste, chopped

curry leaves in slivers

a dose of hing or asephoetida

salt

chopped coriander to garnish

  1. Mix everything except the coriander into the dalia batter.
  2. Heat a non-stick pan, add half a teaspoon of olive oil, pour in batter and make a savoury dalia pancake – brown lightly on both sides. It cooks faster if briefly covered with a lid, much like an omelet.

Garnish, and enjoy hot, either by itself or with a tomato-onion chutney.

Dalia, as it is known in India, is also known as bulgur elsewhere in the world. Thanks, Ms Dalal.
Picture borrowed from http://www.nandyala.org/mahanandi/?p=401

Indonesian ‘sambal’ grilled Fish

This has to be one of the easiest and most delish of fish dishes !
  • Marinate fish fillets with salt and a fair bit of coriander powder (I used mackarel).
  • Pound garlic, green or red chilies and shallots into a coarse paste.
  • Pan fry the fish in minimum oil, remove, add the ground mixture and fry a bit. Return the fish to the pan, toss & saute, and voila … ready to eat.

Wild Olives

Wild olives, anybody ?

Wild Olives

One of the Gangof480 mailed this picture with the message : In my yard. Aren’t they pretty? I am going to have a crack at pickling them. Must be a recipe on google.

How lucky is she to step into her yard to pick this bounty as and when ? Or even to sit in the patio, sipping a coffee, with this view ?

There are plenty of recipes for pickling olives, one of the gang found this recipe on Green Prophet.

Olives are eaten with almost every meal in the Middle East, sometimes even at breakfast. Organically grown olives are the most delicious. Dried and salty or plump and succulent, glowing in gem-like green, black, brown, and purple, olives … some people like their olives hot with fiery chilis. Some prefer them tangy with preserved lemons, or mellowed with bay leaves. You can pickle and season fresh olives by the kilo if you want, and it’s not hard. You will need a knife or a hard rock, and a mason jar or any other large jar with a tight-fitting lid.

It’s in autumn that olives are harvested and appear in the markets. The olives marinate in plain salt brine, changed daily, for a week. During that time their original bitterness will leach out into the water. In the following 4-8 weeks, they marinate in fresh brine and seasonings.

  • 1 kilo fresh olives
  • water
  • salt

After a week, you will need:

  • Olive oil
  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled and halved
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • chili peppers to taste
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Optional: oregano, thyme, rosemary, grains of black pepper, allspice

Rinse the olives, drain. Discard spoiled ones.

Either cut three slits in each olive or crush them with a clean rock, a few at a time. If crushing, only press hard enough to crack them open, not mash them.

Put the olives in the jar.  Cover them with water. Make sure there are none floating – weigh them down with a small saucer or drape a clean recycled plastic bag over the surface of the water to keep them under.

Change the water every 24 hours. Do this for a week.

The olives will lose their bright color as their bitterness leaches out. When the olives are uniformly darker, taste them to judge if they’re ready for brining. If they’re still bitter, soak them and change the water for another few days.

Once the olives are ready, drain them and put them in a large bowl while washing out their jar.

Make a brine. This is:

10 grams of salt for every 100 ml. of water or  7 tablespoons of salt per half-cup of water.

Mix well. Replace the olives in the clean jar. Pour the brine over all. Add herbs and spices to taste. Cover the olives with plenty of olive oil to exclude air and prevent spoilage. Close the jar. Leave it alone for a month, then taste an olive every week or so till you’re satisfied.

Always remove olives for serving with a clean, dry spoon. Keep the majority in their brine and seasonings – they will only improve.